Rev. Samuel H. Smith

 
The Cartersville Express
Cartersville, Georgia
November 6, 1873, Page 2
 
Transcribed by:  
 

OBITUARY.

Reverend SAMUEL H. SMITH, recently one of the proprietors of this paper, and for many years past favorably connected with the press of Georgia, departed this life at his residence in this place, on Thursday morning last, at six o’clock, in the forty-fifth year of his age.  On the following day, in the afternoon, his funeral obsequies were celebrated at the Methodist Church, Dr. Felton officiating, a large and sympathizing congregation joining with heartfelt sorrow in the sad ceremonies which consigned to the grave one, who for many years has been a favorite in the community.  Thus, in the very prime of his life and usefulness, has passed from our midst, one whom we could but illy spare, and whose place in the Church and community it will be difficult to fill.  Kind and genial in his nature, gentle and friendly in all his intercourse with his fellows, always ready to do an act of service or of friendship, the very many friends who knew and prized him here, will not easily forget their former pleasant, cheerful, and useful fellow-citizen; and as they bring to mind his many virtues and his uniform kindness of life, can but mourn the sad Providence which has laid him in his tomb.  During the war, he was acting Chaplain of the sixtieth Georgia Regiment, and faithfully performed all the duties of his arduous position, throughout all dangers, difficulties and distresses of that disastrous period, down to its close, proving himself always the faithful preacher and friend, adviser, and comforter of the soldier in his tent, or the wounded and sick on the battlefield, or amid the harrowing scenes of the hospital.  Returning from the war, he resumed, under many difficulties, his former editorial duties, and to the interest of the community and the cause of virtue and intelligence, devoted himself faithfully and heartily to the day of his death.  For twenty years he was connected with the local ministry of the Methodist Church, and in this capacity, wielded an influence for good, that will long be remembered,  Always ready to pray, or preach, or sing, the house of God was his delight, and the convocation of the saints his favorite resort.  We doubt if a more faithful local preacher in all the bounds on the Conference could be found, or one more continuously and cheerfully wedded to his labors in the gospel.  Never a man of brilliant talents, he brought, however, a zeal and pertinacity of labor to his work in the pulpit and altar, which made him in the churches where he labored, not only a favorite with his brethren, but a workman of singular usefulness and value.  In the circle of his home, he was kind, indulgent and good, the affectionate father and devoted husband.

His death is a loss to us all, his home, his friends, the community, and the church; and as we close this feeble tribute to his memory, bowing submissively, but in hope, to the smitings of that all wise Providence, which has thus, by taking a faithful servant to Himself, afflicted a whole community, we almost wish that it had been otherwise, and that “SAM SMITH” could to-day be by our side.  Sweetly and silently he slumbers now, waiting the sound of the arch-angel’s trump, and we shall hear his voice and see his kindly face no more, ‘till the heavens and the earth are passed away.  He sleeps in peace. [An excerpt from an obituary of Samuel Smith published in the Atlanta Constitution can also be found on this page.]

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December 18, 1873
Page 2.

Letters of Administration.

Sallie W. Smith on the estate of Samuel H, Smith, deceased.

 

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